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I have a 2009 RT and the power door locks are INOP (on all doors). If you press the button on the fob to lock or unlock you can hear it and the light will come on. When you try to lock by the fob, interior, headlight will come on and it will arm the alarm. The door lock switches do not work to lock or unlock nor does the fob lock or unlock the doors. I do have power going in and coming out of the actuator, so would this be the door lock module that is on the drivers door, Does this one module control all doors. Again this effects all four doors and the power windows do work off the switches
 

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There is a fuse in the rear fuse box (trunk) for the door locks ... check it.
The BCM (body control module) monitors inputs from the power lock switches and the RF hub to provide control of the power lock motors through high-side and low-side driver outputs. The BCM is the primary power lock system controller. The BCM is located under the dash behind the glove box.
The power lock switches are hard wired to their respective Driver Door Module (DDM) or Passenger Door Module (PDM). The BCM, the DDM and the PDM all communicate with each other and with other electronic modules over the Controller Area Network (CAN) data bus.
When a door module receives an input from a power lock switch, it sends the appropriate electronic 'Lock Request' or 'Unlock Request' message to the BCM over the CAN data bus. The BCM responds to these request messages by providing the appropriate outputs to each of the power lock motors to lock or unlock each of the door latches.
When one of these modules detects a problem in any of the power lock system circuits, or components, it stores a fault code or Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) in its memory circuit. If you have a OBD2/CAN scanner that can read all codes, plug it into the car's OBD2 port and perform a full scan to see if any DTCs are logged.
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Without a DTC to use as a starting point it comes down to checking the wiring harness/connectors and voltage/grounds to see if you can trace back to the problem.
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