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I’m new here and I’m interested in your experiences. My little brother passed away in 2017 and left his 08 Charger he really loved. However engine is no good and we are looking for a engine. So I know it may not be worth it and with expenses and labor maybe easier to just get a new Charger but with the sentimental value we have to fix it. I was wondering what could we do to update the engine and where to even begin. Can it be swapped for a bigger or better engine? Does it have to be from a specific vendor? And what maybe other ideas that have worked. We do have a budget but I don’t even know where to begin. Every mechanic I’ve called seems to not know at all pricing and if ir can be done. Please help! We appreciate it.
 

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Welcome from AZ. Easiest would be to replace the engine with a remanufactured 2.7 .
 

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Welcome to the forum from Western NY. I agree, it's probably best to just replace the engine, either with a 2.7 or possibly a 3.5 if it's not too difficult to upgrade to the 3.5.
 

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Welcome aboard, Cesar.

It sounds like you may already be aware that this is going to be a troublesome, expensive project with poor returns, other than the sentimental value you mentioned.

With that said, here are the challenges as I see them;

Used 2.7s in good running condition have always been in high demand and short supply. In 2020, they may not be in very high demand, but supply is even less, since they haven't been manufactured in more than ten years, but they still fail and require replacement. So barring, say, a lucky Craigslist find, the odds of coming across a decent used engine at a fair price are not good.

You can still buy remanufactured 2.7s. You'd be looking at $2,000 to $3,000 or more for a rebuilt long block, and that's just the cost of the engine, not including installation labor, fluids, filters, mounts, sensors, gaskets, spark plugs, and all the other may-as-wells that come along with a properly done engine swap.

Speaking of labor, you might be surprised at the number of shops that just won't touch a job like this. The 2.7 has such a high failure rate that many mechanics refuse to do major repairs on them, as they're concerned about comebacks and unhappy customers damaging their reputations. This has been the case for so long that the pool of mechanics familiar enough with the 2.7 (and its quirks) to repair them effectively has gotten smaller and smaller.

You can replace the 2.7 with a 3.5, but the 3.5 has it's own problems, and good-running examples aren't exactly stacked up like cordwood in boneyards. Plus, this is a much more involved swap. The same is true with the 5.7...not a cheap engine to find used, and not an easy or straightforward swap into 2.7 car.

They key to repairing a car like this is to find either an independent shop or a mechanic who "works on the side", is very familiar with the Mopar LX platform, and is willing to try interesting projects. For example, one option would be to buy a clean used 4.0 from a RWD Chrysler, like a Pacifica. That's actually a pretty solid engine and there's very little demand for them, so they're cheap to buy and at least as good as the 3.5 when you're finished. But that would require buying a scrap 3.5 too, to get accessories and other assorted parts compatible with the LX platform. It's not too exotic a swap, but it will take some time. Unfortunately, time is money for most shops. But some guys tinker with these cars for fun and might enjoy the opportunity to do the swap and learn along the way.

Of course, if money is no object, you can just go to a dealer or a large chain shop and pony up $6,000-8,000 or so for a rebuilt 2.7.

Good luck whatever you decide to do!
 

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Woah, the Pacifica used to be RWD?! The current models on the Chrysler site have it as front. If it used to be RWD I might try looking for an older one for the wife.

Edit, sorry meant to quote @CtCarl but don’t know how to add it after initially posting.
 

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I used your link and even did some searching of my own. Closest I can find is that the 2020 awd can be set to RWD only. Can’t find any actual rwd on them. And your link states that they weren’t built on the LX platform rather offered with an lx trim level. Damn it you had my hopes up. I was hoping for a modern day Astro van lol.
 

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Welcome to the Z, from Pittsburgh! I can add no insights beyond the above ones, but good luck with your project!
 

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I used your link and even did some searching of my own. Closest I can find is that the 2020 awd can be set to RWD only. Can’t find any actual rwd on them. And your link states that they weren’t built on the LX platform rather offered with an lx trim level. Damn it you had my hopes up. I was hoping for a modern day Astro van lol.
FWIW, I was suggesting that one option for the OP would be a 4.0 V-6 out of a 2007-2008 Pacifica. They're based on the CS platform, not the LX, which is why I said he'd need a scrap 3.5 also, for the parts to install it in an LX.

I did conflate the Pacifica with the RWD Nitro. Either one would work as a donor car for the OP, but neither one is an RWD minivan. Sorry about that.
 
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