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Discussion Starter #1
What do you guys feel about painting a car (or bumper cover in this case) myself.

I have 0 experience but I'm very much a DIY type of guy. I got banged up in my last accident and it was just about all aesthetic so I decided to do it myself. I should have just paid the damn deductible but I have to say it's been fun putting everything back together. Anyway, putting the final touches on, I figured if I can pickup a new skill throughout this whole thing (painting) I'm all for it.

How hard is it? I'm looking at pitch black paint. I don't know if that helps -- I would think it might make it a bit easier to learn on black? Who knows, like I said, I have no experience with it other than plasti-dipping my emblems and wheels -- yeah so like I said, zero experience.

The front bumper cover I ordered came in flat black. I love the flat black look, but don't want to drop that much money on my car if it's not going to give me a performance increase.

Give me the hard facts and I'll make my decision based on that. I want this thing looking pretty again, and soon.

Thanks in advance.
 

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Drive it like u stole it!
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What do you guys feel about painting a car (or bumper cover in this case) myself.

I have 0 experience but I'm very much a DIY type of guy. I got banged up in my last accident and it was just about all aesthetic so I decided to do it myself. I should have just paid the damn deductible but I have to say it's been fun putting everything back together. Anyway, putting the final touches on, I figured if I can pickup a new skill throughout this whole thing (painting) I'm all for it.

How hard is it? I'm looking at pitch black paint. I don't know if that helps -- I would think it might make it a bit easier to learn on black? Who knows, like I said, I have no experience with it other than plasti-dipping my emblems and wheels -- yeah so like I said, zero experience.

The front bumper cover I ordered came in flat black. I love the flat black look, but don't want to drop that much money on my car if it's not going to give me a performance increase.

Give me the hard facts and I'll make my decision based on that. I want this thing looking pretty again, and soon.

Thanks in advance.
Painting a car can be tricky but doesn't mean you can't do it. It more about the prep than anything and making sure you don't put on heavy coats. That being said, you are trying to match the color that is on the rest of the car and that's were it gets tricky. Black is also one of the hardest colors to match up as well. Better off leaving it to the pros if this is your first time. Couple hundred should be all it is if you bring them a bumper they don't have to fix and you do the labor other than the actually painting.
 

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2017 Dodge Charger R/T
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Yea, I agree. may want to leave it to a bodyshop. trying to match that color is going to be a tough one. But, don't want to discourage you. Everything had to be done a 1st time before, right??
 

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Well seeing as you probably do not have access to a paint booth or better spray equipment chances are it will not be as good as it could be. But you can always give it a try however you could end up spending more if it has to be redone by a body shop.
 

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You wont get pitch black out of plasti dip but if you decide to use plasti dip itll be safe to try yourself. I did my wheels and my spoiler and they both turned out fine
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks guys, sounds like the smart thing to do is take the damn thing back off and bring it to the shop.
 

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Dave
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Weighing your options, I'd say having a shop do it is probably your best bet. You need a clean place to paint, a paint gun, buy the primer, matching paint color, hardener, clear coat, cleaning and prepping supplies, and a lot of patience. Not going to get away with rattle-can stuff if you want it to look halfway decent, let alone match. You'd probably also want to see if a scrap yard has a fender or something that you could have to try at home.
If you wanted to do this, and maybe start doing body work on the side? Then yeah, it might be worth the investment and learning how to paint. Since you're only looking at just one bumper cover right now, it's probably not worth it. I really wish that I had that skill under my belt for any time that I might need it, but I don't... I just have a friend that does. :)
Anyway, my buddy that does collision work said that usually for an estimate for an insurance company, to buy a bumper cover, prep, paint, and install it, it's typically around $600. Since you already have the bumper cover (~$200-300), you're probably looking at around $300 to have them prep and paint it. Completely depends on the shop and sometimes whether or not they have that color in stock, and how much the supplies cost.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Anyway, my buddy that does collision work said that usually for an estimate for an insurance company, to buy a bumper cover, prep, paint, and install it, it's typically around $600. Since you already have the bumper cover (~$200-300), you're probably looking at around $300 to have them prep and paint it. Completely depends on the shop and sometimes whether or not they have that color in stock, and how much the supplies cost.
Thanks, I appreciate that. I really do want the skill but like you said its absolutely an investment. I am probably going to be looking into starting it up, once I fork over the cash for the starting supplies, I'll be in too deep to back out and probably go through with learning the whole process.

That's how I learn anything, I spend enough money into and since I hate wasting money, I'll just go through with the damn thing. Anyway, thanks again I appreciate your honest input.
 

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IMO the biggest obstacle would be gaining the experience. In addition to things already mentioned like being able to match the paint, having decent equipment and the right environment, you will need to develop the technique so you can lay the paint on evenly and without drips. That means knowing how far away the spray nozzle should be from the work, how fast to move the nozzle and what the setting on the equipment should be. Gaining those skills only come with experience. Fortunately, you can practice of pieces of scrap but I would say you should expect to make at least 3 practice runs before you start on the real stuff.
 

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Dave
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Right. And your mixing ratios, spray pattern, thickness, navigating corners and cavities without excess paint build-up that could cause runs or drips, etc. No shortcut for experience.
 

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Painting a car can be tricky but doesn't mean you can't do it. It more about the prep than anything and making sure you don't put on heavy coats. That being said, you are trying to match the color that is on the rest of the car and that's were it gets tricky. Black is also one of the hardest colors to match up as well. Better off leaving it to the pros if this is your first time. Couple hundred should be all it is if you bring them a bumper they don't have to fix and you do the labor other than the actually painting.
Yes agree with you, well saying, I'm professionally dong it.
 
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