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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Back in March, when it was about 35 degrees out, i was making about 310 peak hp and 245 peak torque.
Now, when it's about 90 degrees out, I'm making about 260 peak hp, and 210 peak torque.
In the morning when it's about 70 out, I make about 275 peak hp, and about 220 torque.
I have a diablo tune.
Should I be losing this much power?
 

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If you have a CAI thats whats doing it. Its probably sucking in hot air from the engine bay making you lose power. If thats the case, put the stock airbox back in with the stock piping and you will probably get your power back.

From what Im reading, only the Legmaker, and a couple CAIs that get air from the inner fender, or from the lower airdam actually gets cold air and works with the system properly.
 

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The other affect on HP/TQ is air density (temp, pressure, humidity). The atmospheric pressure, temperature and humidity all affect the density of the air. On a hot day or on a moist day the air is less dense. A reduction in air density reduces the amount of oxygen available for combustion and therefore reduces the engine horsepower and torque.
For example, at 85 deg F, 25.09 in-hg absolute pressure, 58 deg F dew point, the engine only produces about 81.1% of the rated horsepower.

You can use the calculator at the following website to calculate Relative HP based on the air density conditions. If you have the engine's intake air temp (IAT) use that in the calculations. Otherwise, just use the atmospheric air temperature.

https://wahiduddin.net/calc/calc_hp_abs_dp.htm
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The other affect on HP/TQ is air density (temp, pressure, humidity). The atmospheric pressure, temperature and humidity all affect the density of the air. On a hot day or on a moist day the air is less dense. A reduction in air density reduces the amount of oxygen available for combustion and therefore reduces the engine horsepower and torque.
For example, at 85 deg F, 25.09 in-hg absolute pressure, 58 deg F dew point, the engine only produces about 81.1% of the rated horsepower.

You can use the calculator at the following website to calculate Relative HP based on the air density conditions. If you have the engine's intake air temp (IAT) use that in the calculations. Otherwise, just use the atmospheric air temperature.

https://wahiduddin.net/calc/calc_hp_abs_dp.htm
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Thanks for the link, but it says I shouldn’t have that big of a difference. I don’t have a CAI btw.
 

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I agree with Harry and djalbin above. I have a stock intake and lose about a half a second on my 0 to 60 times during the summer months. I estimate 10 horsepower or more is lost for every 10 degrees hotter. My record is 4.9 in 35 degrees. No way I can do that right now in the 90's outside. :/
 
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