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Hi Everyone - I noticed a post about an Alternator part #4801833AB: Another 2011-2014 alternator recall

This Alternator 180 amp was put in my Jeep Grand Cherokee 5.7L 2wd to replace a 220amp back in April 2019. (I know I’m in Dodge forum but we share parts :)
Dealership has had problems pinpointing the problem. Symptoms are the vehicle is running rough (especially in the 60-70mph range) and then smooths out. Other symptoms are that windows are sometimes going down with car off and locks going up on their own. PO334 was code being thrown but Engine light keeps going on after replacing camshaft sensor several times. Wire harness replacement, battery replacement, PCM and before my problem the Alternator (mentioned above) and the 1st PCM were replaced because apparently a battery light was on.

so my guess was - is this Alternator bad? The dealership insists it checks out fine but as I see in an old post there was a recall on it years ago.
Thoughts???
 

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4801833AB is a valid PN for the 5.7L Hemi. It may depend on the model year but the Charger RT came from the factory with an optional 180A alternator; it may be standard in the newest model years. Pursuit Chargers came with 220A alternators. You can see what came from the factory with your car by linking to the following website ... FCA RAM

For diagnosing your problems, plug a OBD2/CAN scanner into the car's OBD2 port and see what diagnostic codes are being logged. Use a scanner that can read all codes (not just powertrain codes). If you're having electrical problems the codes being logged may be chassis & body codes.
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The "normal" alternator issue is that it doesn't charge at all, so the battery goes dead. Secondly, I've seen it where it's not big enough to keep the battery charged; especially after mods; sound system, ignition boxes, etc. When the windows go down with it off, is it with the retained power thing still active? Like when we shut the ignition off, we can put the windows down for a few minutes until we exit?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
4801833AB is a valid PN for the 5.7L Hemi. It may depend on the model year but the Charger RT came from the factory with an optional 180A alternator; it may be standard in the newest model years. Pursuit Chargers came with 220A alternators. You can see what came from the factory with your car by linking to the following website ... FCA RAM

For diagnosing your problems, plug a OBD2/CAN scanner into the car's OBD2 port and see what diagnostic codes are being logged. Use a scanner that can read all codes (not just powertrain codes). If you're having electrical problems the codes being logged may be chassis & body codes.
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I know that the 220amp was original in mine. PO334 (camshaft sensor code) is what keeps getting thrown. Car is riding rough, And when that engine light comes on it will start stalling and fail to start. Then windows, door locks, and lights have mind of their own it seems.
 

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The "normal" alternator issue is that it doesn't charge at all, so the battery goes dead. Secondly, I've seen it where it's not big enough to keep the battery charged; especially after mods; sound system, ignition boxes, etc. When the windows go down with it off, is it with the retained power thing still active? Like when we shut the ignition off, we can put the windows down for a few minutes until we exit?
With mine it seems like battery is not charging properly and also car is running rough (especially in the 60-70mph range and then will smooth out). After driving several hundred miles or going through on/off cycles the car is throwing Engine Light and P0334 code, and then stalling out and failing to start. Everything has been replaced in this vehicle with regards to wire harness, PCM, battery and supposedly there are no ground issues but grounds are tricky. Something is making this car not function properly and dealership cannot pin it down. Last option was to check the Tone/Refluctor ring but it was scoped and results we’re supposedly good. My assertion is something is causing this voltage problem and I think it could be that alternator or ground/wire issue. I’m going to have to bring it to another place to get diagnosed. I’m curious as to why my battery would be at 41% and then all of a sudden have to be replaced the other day..? I’m also thinking that if it’s mechanical (like reluctor/tone) that’s not gonna make the windows go down when off and make those door locks go up and down...and lights come on for no reason after car is off. Thoughts?
 

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Lights and door locks are some of the functions supported or controlled by the BCM (body control module). The BCM controls many of the main body electronic functions and features of the vehicle. The BCM is also the gateway between the high and low speed CAN (controller area network) data bus networks.
Some of the functions and features the BCM supports or controls include:
Ambient temperature sensor monitoring
Brake fluid level monitoring
Customer programmable features enable and disable control
Door and hood ajar switch monitoring
Electric BackLight (EBL) control
Exterior lighting systems control
Fuel level monitoring
Horn system control
Ignition switch state monitoring
Interior lighting systems control
Park brake switch state monitoring
Power lock system control
Remote start enable and disable control
Tip start enable and disable control
Universal transmitter (HomeLink™) feed control
Vehicle Theft Alarm (VTA) indicator control
Washer fluid level monitoring
Wiper and washer system control

The BCM is also the Local Interface Network (LIN) master node. In this role it gathers information from the Intelligent Battery Sensor (IBS) and then either acts on that information directly or places messages on the CAN data bus for use by other modules.

The PCM supplies the 5V signal to various sensors (e.g. camshaft position sensor), controls output of the alternator, and voltage regulation to the battery. But they replaced the PCM.

If the battery was drained too low it could have killed some of the cells. My battery was replaced because parasitic loads drained the battery and affected some of the cells. Ignition-Off Draw (IOD) is a normal condition where power is being drained from the battery with the ignition switch in the Off position. A normal vehicle electrical system will draw from five to thirty-five milliamperes (0.005 to 0.035 ampere) with the ignition switch in the Off position. If the IOD is over thirty-five milliamperes, there's a problem and you need to isolate the component/circuit that's drawing too much power.
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Discussion Starter #7
Lights and door locks are some of the functions supported or controlled by the BCM (body control module). The BCM controls many of the main body electronic functions and features of the vehicle. The BCM is also the gateway between the high and low speed CAN (controller area network) data bus networks.
Some of the functions and features the BCM supports or controls include:
Ambient temperature sensor monitoring
Brake fluid level monitoring
Customer programmable features enable and disable control
Door and hood ajar switch monitoring
Electric BackLight (EBL) control
Exterior lighting systems control
Fuel level monitoring
Horn system control
Ignition switch state monitoring
Interior lighting systems control
Park brake switch state monitoring
Power lock system control
Remote start enable and disable control
Tip start enable and disable control
Universal transmitter (HomeLink™) feed control
Vehicle Theft Alarm (VTA) indicator control
Washer fluid level monitoring
Wiper and washer system control

The BCM is also the Local Interface Network (LIN) master node. In this role it gathers information from the Intelligent Battery Sensor (IBS) and then either acts on that information directly or places messages on the CAN data bus for use by other modules.

The PCM supplies the 5V signal to various sensors (e.g. camshaft position sensor), controls output of the alternator, and voltage regulation to the battery. But they replaced the PCM.

If the battery was drained too low it could have killed some of the cells. My battery was replaced because parasitic loads drained the battery and affected some of the cells. Ignition-Off Draw (IOD) is a normal condition where power is being drained from the battery with the ignition switch in the Off position. A normal vehicle electrical system will draw from five to thirty-five milliamperes (0.005 to 0.035 ampere) with the ignition switch in the Off position. If the IOD is over thirty-five milliamperes, there's a problem and you need to isolate the component/circuit that's drawing too much power.
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Finally an answer that I understand and sounds correct after many people’s input!! I agree - there is a draw and I need to find it...would the ignition switch be a possible area that could draw/short? I guess I will hopefully find out this week. I’m bringing the car to someone new. I sort of feel the alternator is causing this somehow.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Finally an answer that I understand and sounds correct after many people’s input!! I agree - there is a draw and I need to find it...would the ignition switch be a possible area that could draw/short? I guess I will hopefully find out this week. I’m bringing the car to someone new. I sort of feel the alternator is causing this somehow.
If you add the continual throwing of the P0334 camshaft sensor code and the riding rough and then eventually stalling after a week or two - does that help isolate it?
 

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The rough running/stalling (P0334 code) sounds more like a sensor (cam and/or crank position sensors) or PCM issue. Excessive IOD can be caused by inoperative or shorted electronic modules and components , internally shorted alternator, or intermittent shorts in the wiring. Of course a short can cause gremlins to occur just about anywhere. There is a IOD Test than can be run to measure the amount of IOD and isolate the cause if IOD is excessive.
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The rough running/stalling (P0334 code) sounds more like a sensor (cam and/or crank position sensors) or PCM issue. Excessive IOD can be caused by inoperative or shorted electronic modules and components , internally shorted alternator, or intermittent shorts in the wiring. Of course a short can cause gremlins to occur just about anywhere. There is a IOD Test than can be run to measure the amount of IOD and isolate the cause if IOD is excessive.
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Yes I believe the alternator is shorted internally or I have another short somewhere else. The sensors have been changed multiple times.
 
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